Do Your Business Blog Posts Have Long Enough Tails?

guest post by my friend, author Patricia Snodgrass

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What Do Long Tail Keywords Mean?

What is a long tail keyword?  Do you pick one up at the rescue shelter? Does it require a cat box, food, water, regular grooming? Does your new long tail keyword require spaying or neutering?

 

The answer is of course, none of the above.  Simply stated, a long tail keyword is a string of specific key words designed to bring better quality hits to your webpage.  Long tail keywords are designed to help searchers find your site quicker and easier.

 

The average keyword could get lots of hits to your website, but that isn’t going to do you any good if those hits are unproductive. When someone uses a long tail keyword, they are able to find your site because you have what the searcher is looking for. You may not get as many hits with long term keywords, as you would with the average garden variety keyword, but what you will get is people who will be more interested in what you have to say, or in what you are trying to sell.

 

Lets say you’re looking for a book on how to use keywords more efficiently, but you are as clueless as I am when it comes to talking about adwords, rankings and SERPS. So, you go to amazon.com to find a book that’s easy to understand, but once you type in keyword  in their books menu, you get far too many hits. You have neither time nor energy to pick through all the books to find the one you want. How do you find the book you’re looking for?

 

If you were to type in, easy to understand book keywords ad words, you will find the book you’re searching for quickly.  For example, I typed in easy to understand keywords and the Book For Dummies was the top hit. Ultimate Guide to Google AdWords: How to Access 100 Million People in 10 Minutes

 

In order for your article to receive a high ranking on SERPS, you need to create long tail keywords to sprinkle into your article, so the search engine can “see” you. For example, you are writing an article about bearded irises, but you wish to write about specific irises, like purple bearded irises.  You would sprinkle the long tail keywords ‘purple bearded irises’ into your article along with any other long tail keywords you would like to use.  However, you don’t want to overdo it, otherwise your article will sound weird.  The author must never dilute the quality of their work by adding too many keywords, be they long or small.

 

Drawing a blank? Try the free keyword tool, Ubersuggest

 


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